Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
26. “The Gate of Ghosts” by Karen Joy Fowler I approached this story warily. On the one hand, Karen Joy Fowler has a strong reputation among people whose opinions on sf I respect. On the other, the only story of hers I’d read previously, “The Lake Was Full Of Artificial Things” in the third of these anthologies, did nothing for me. And on a third hand - if I may be so bold - the nature of her reputation suggests “The Lake Was Full Of Artificial Things” could be representative of her...

Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
25. “Snake Eyes” by Tom Maddox When you let the US military mess with your mind, you don’t get it back so easily. At the beginning of the story I felt like this was a Vietnam War metaphor. At the end I felt like it was the uncompleted opening to a novel. Although, I’ve trouble imagining where that could go without twisting away from the focus of the story so far. Thinking about it, perhaps the reason this feels unsatisfactorily incomplete is the AI and minions promising our test...

Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
24. “Down and Out in the Year 2000” by Kim Stanley Robinson The backdrop makes this science fiction, but I don’t think it needed to be. This is a story of poverty in America as the world falls apart in war, which it feels like I’ve read five times already in this book alone. It could have been a shared world piece with Swanwick’s “Covenant of Souls”, frex. Normally when I say something like that I mean it as some sort of savage criticism, but I liked this story. And I liked it...

Previously Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: First Annual Collection

 
Reading and writing about “Survival” in the fourth volume of this series naturally brought to mind the other story featuring human-ape relations. I liked “Her Furry Face” by Leigh Kennedy in the first volume a whole lot less than “Survival”, but not for being badly written. Rather it is an unsettling portrait of the misogyny and victim-blaming logic with which the male protagonist resents the women in his life. He manages to rape an orang utan student in his care, convince himself it...

Workplace humour

 
Co-worker: *taking a book to shelve* Dr Seuss. Me: *mishears as 'Dr Zeus'* Me: Dr Zeus would be very different and probably much less suitable for...

Oops

 
First day without any deadline looming over my head in several months (okay, one) and of course I start it off by crying because I feel lonely. Okay, okay, I started it off with a walk around the neighbourhood and breakfast, but then. Talked things over with one of my partners and feeling better about things for now. But since no actual circumstance is changed or readily able to be changed. So, still lonely. Not sure there is anything to do for that unless I can somehow make some new friends. And...

I promised myself a reward

 
It's late and I'm tired but I'm experimenting with following through on my desire to journal more so here we are. Again and again and again, right? I got my last assignment in a little bit ago. It's late but it's done and I hope the latter counts for more than the former. I know I wouldn't mark myself favourably for it but maybe the school will be more lenient. I wouldn't have let me get this far in school, so maybe they will let me get away with it again. I'm looking forward to having tomorrow...

Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
23. “Surviving” by Judith Moffett Queer, somewhat erotic tale. The major caveat for this story would be that it revolves around two white women, one of whom was raised by chimpanzees between the ages of 4 and 13, and the other who devoted her professional career to studying the first woman. The substance of the story revolves more around the bond they build as friends and lovers and their unspoken attempt at cultural exchange. Trying to bring to bring the one more fully into the human...

Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
22. “Jeff Beck” by Lewis Shiner Strange little story in the ‘be careful what you wish for’ vein when - I’m not sure - but gaining the ability to play guitar like a master doesn’t make for effortless fun, because your standards and aspirations are raised correspondingly higher. Also, blowing your savings on a guitar is bad for your...

Currently Reading - The Year's Best Science Fiction: Fourth Annual Collection

 
21. “Sallie C.” by Neal Barrett Jr. Not science fiction. In an isolated desert hotel the paths of the Wright Brothers, the Rommels, Billy the Kid, someone named Pat Garrett and a Native American stereotype briefly intersect. Felt like the main appeal was in recognition and revelation, but perhaps someone with a particular interest in those figures might have drawn more from this...